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Hooke's Law Formula

Hooke's law is a principle of physics that states that the force needed to extend or compress a spring by some distance is proportional to that distance. That is: where is a constant factor characteristic of the spring, its stiffness. One of the properties of elasticity is that it takes about twice as much force to stretch a spring twice as far. That linear dependence of displacement upon stretching force is called Hooke's law. Hooke's Law is that which says that how much stress we apply on any body that much strain will be observed on it. which means Stress $\propto$ Strain.

Hooke's Law
Hooke's Law Formula is given byHooke's Law Formula
Where,

$F$ is the amount of force applied in $N$,

$x$ is the displacement in the spring in $m$

$k$ is the spring constant or force constant.

Hooke's law formula is used to determine the force constant, displacement and force in a stretched spring.

Related Calculators
Hooke's Law Calculator Beer Lambert Law Calculator
Boyle's Law Calculator Charles Law Calculator
 

Hooke's Law Problems

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Below are some problems on Hooke's law which may be helpful for you.

Solved Examples

Question 1: A spring is stretched by 5 cm and has force constant of 2 cm /dyne. Calculate the Force applied?
Solution:
 
Given: Force constant k = 2 cm/dyne,
          Extension x = 5 cm.
The force applied is given by F = - kx
                                             = - 2cm/dyne $\times$ 5 cm
                                             = - 10 cm/dyne.
 

Question 2: A force of 100 N is stretching a spring by 0.2 m. Calculate the force constant?
Solution:
 
Given: Force F = 100 N,
          Extension x = 0.2 m.
The force constant is given by k = - $\frac{F}{x}$
                                               = - $\frac{100N}{0.2 m}$
                                               = - 500 N/m.
 

More topics in Hooke's Law Formula
Spring Constant Formula Potential Energy of a Spring Formula
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